By Francis Ohanyido

In 2019, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution proclaiming September 28th as the International Day for Universal Access to Information. This momentous occasion underscores the significance of the right to seek, receive, and impart information as an integral part of freedom of expression. It is a reminder that in our increasingly digital age, access to information is not just a privilege but a fundamental human right.

To commemorate this day, a conference is being held at the University of Oxford, focusing on the theme "the importance of the online space for access to information." In an era dominated by digital technology, this topic could not be more pertinent. The event will be moderated by James Deane, a prominent figure in the field of media and information accessibility. However, even if you cannot attend in person, you can register remotely, thanks to the very medium we are celebrating—the internet.

The scope of the conference is vast, but one of its central pillars from my point of view, is the role of the online space in providing access to accurate and timely health information. In an age where the internet has become a repository of knowledge and a platform for communication, its significance in the realm of healthcare cannot be overstated.

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WAIPH, Institute, Public Health, AfricaPerformance-Based Financing to Accelerate the Coverage and Quality of Nutrition Services in Nigeria

Full Title: Performance-Based Financing to Accelerate the Coverage and Quality of Nutrition Services in Nigeria: How Programme Implementers of the ANRiN Project Can Achieve High-impact

Abstract

Malnutrition remains a pressing public health issue in Nigeria, particularly affecting children under the age of five. This paper explores the potential of Performance-Based Financing (PBF) as a catalyst for improving the coverage and quality of nutrition services in the country. The Accelerating Nutrition Results in Nigeria Project (ANRiN) serves as a case study to illustrate how PBF can be leveraged effectively by program implementers. Key principles of PBF, such as clear performance targets, transparent payment systems, robust monitoring and evaluation, capacity building, and sustainability, are examined in-depth to outline a roadmap for achieving high-impact outcomes in the ANRiN project.  

Introduction

Malnutrition is a persistent and pervasive public health challenge in Nigeria, affecting approximately 30% of children under the age of five (World Bank, 2018). The consequences of malnutrition are far-reaching, not only impacting individual health but also posing substantial economic and social burdens on the nation. Addressing malnutrition is a critical step toward achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly Goal 2, which aims to end hunger, achieve food security, and improve nutrition by 2030 (United Nations, 2015).

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WAIPH, Institute, Public Health, AfricaAfrica CDC's Rising: Navigating the Success Tempest and the New Public Health Order

By Francis Ohanyido

“The New Public Health Order- Takes a Village”- Dr Francis Ohanyido

As the world grapples with the intricacies of global health, the African continent is at the forefront of a transformative journey. The Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (Africa CDC) is solidifying its leading role in shaping the New Public Health Order. In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic, when countries and regions realized the perils of depending solely on global health systems during a crisis, Africa CDC emerged as a beacon of hope. This article delves into the pivotal role Africa CDC is assuming, analyzing its key advantages, challenges, and its ongoing collaboration with stakeholders like the World Health Organisation (WHO) in the African Region (AFRO) and subregional multilateral health agencies like the West African Health Organisation (WAHO). While the organization is carving out a unique path, it's vital to remember that there are those who find it hard to fathom an African success story.

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